Saturday, March 13, 2010

Legal and Political Round-up for Skeptics and Atheists

- Women obtaining or even seeking an abortion in Utah can now be charged with homicide. I'm amazed that this has been so quiet in the national news.

- Texas continues making a shambles of its educational system, now removing mention of Thomas Jefferson from state-approved textbooks and replacing him with the founder of Baptism, John Calvin. (How you can defend removing one of the Founding Fathers from your school system under the guise of patriotism is quite beyond me.)

As the NCSE has been trumpeting, just because you don't live in Texas doesn't mean you're safe: Christianists know full well that because Texas is such a huge textbook market that as goes the Texas Board of Education, so goes the nation. No need to do anything at the Federal level where the national press will catch it - do it in Bible Belt's largest population center, Texas. Little Green Footballs has done a great job of covering this, and fortunately now the national media has picked up the story - here's an interview with the Creationist-in-Chief of the Texas BoE, Don McElroy. Forget about Ken Ham, here's the most dangerous creationist in America.

- The Supreme Court will consider the legal validity of people trying to sue vaccine makers for injuring their children. It looks ridiculous on its face, but never say never.

- And of course there is the unfortunate Pledge "Under God" decision (the article is just tbelow this one). If it's just ceremonial, then would "in submission to Allah" be an acceptable substitute to "under God"?

2 comments:

Philippe said...

Sorry for the off-topic: All this nonsense is why I decided to become politically active. I attended a Coffee Party party (meeting) yesterday, and will likely change my registration to Independent or Green. It's hard to figure out what actions to take, when voting seems to not be effective; we change the person getting bribed, but not the systems that bribes them.

Michael Caton said...

Yep, once you commit to secular values, you realize that it's really a political problem, not a philosophical one. I ran across a coffee party this weekend without even trying to. I was registered Libertarian until I moved to San Diego when I switched back to Republican so I can maybe do something to drag the party back toward the center; Libertarian primaries tend not to need much deliberation.